Low track to “High Lane”

Details

  • Director: Abel Ferry
  • Writer(s): Johanne Bernard and Louis-Paul Desanges
  • Starring: Fanny Valette, Johan Liereau, Nicolas Giraud, Raphael Lenglet
  • Released: June 24, 2009 (France)

Synopsis

High Lane tells the tale of a group of friends who go into the mountains on a climbing trip, and after enduring many dangerous extreme-sport scenarios, discover that they are going to have to brave more than just the terrain, and themselves, to survive.

Review

I was 15 minutes into High Lane (2009) before I realized it was dubbed in English, and I was 30 minutes into High Lane before I realized I wasn’t going to see any mutants circa Wrong Turn (2003), which is sad because every once in a while I pick a film at random just to see what’s happening in the world of indie (ish) horror films, and sometimes I find an interesting story in a pile of ill-conceived scripts and what might be movies made as tax write-offs.

Director Abel Ferry oversaw both High Lane and the television film Piege blanc but had no other ventures into film from what I could tell, and I think this is worth something when considering the content of the film. It’s not an incompetent movie, but it’s not adept, and like many films that have an interesting premise but still fall short—the execution is often lackluster. Writers Johanne Bernard and Louis-Paul Desanges do not add much else aside from the initial pitch it seems, and the stars—Fanny Valette, Johan Libereau, Raphael Lenglet—work with what they’ve got in the script, which is not much.

Case in point, once the squabbling between the characters started I began to tune out—I’ve seen this all before. As Boromir from the Lord of the Rings (2001) might say, “One does not simply go on a camping trip with your friends in a movie and not get into Whose afraid of Virginia Woolf-level arguments.” Hours seemed to go by, and I was still holding out hope that a three-eyed humanoid would jump out from behind a tree and ravage one of the climbers with his three arms and jerry-rigged penis (oh, come one, it’s a mutant I’m imagining for gods’ sake!). I mean, I was begging for anything to get me out of this 84-minute French film based on the finer points of mountain climbing and how not to act in social settings—even if you are trapped in the mountains.

High Lane is exactly like Cliffhanger (1993) starring Sylvester Stallone except all of the fun has been sucked out of it and it’s less intelligible than John Lithgow’s henchman—you know the one who screams and curses his way through the whole film? Moreover, much of the character development has been replaced by the actors loudly screaming each other’s names. It helped me figure out which character was which, but as I sat there, I could feel my life draining due to decibel exhaustion. Then, suddenly, one of the characters stepped on a bear trap and I sat up in my chair, excitement boiling in my stomach. Then someone fell into a pit and the vague stirrings of elation began to rise in my chest.

“Mutants!?” I cried, and my wife stuck her head in the room confused at her husband’s sudden outburst. She saw tears in my eyes—only the second time she’s seen me shed tears (the first time involved the birth of my child)—and I looked upon the screen triumphantly as the mutant antagonist emerged. I was right from the beginning, there was a mutant in High Lane, dammit, and I had good fortune for a while, but one must realize that if a film has difficulty injecting life into archetypical characters and a-typical plot structure, well, even a crazed mutant will only get you so far (I hate writing that because mutants are so much fun when done right).

I want to say High Lane was original because it blended mountain climbing with The Hills Have Eyes (2006) and High Tension (2003) (which is also French), but it was too similar to too many films. This movie is the rehashing of repeated themes, and the viewer will recognize these tropes: a doomed relationship headed for terror, a timid teenage boy with a crush (he’s just a super nice guy), an alpha survivalist guy who can’t possibly live until the end of the film, a maniacal woodsman (aka mutant), a frantic woman who does all of the wrong things to get herself killed, a strong independent woman who is clearly the “final girl,” and frat house-level ass grab-assing. This is every Friday the 13th without the entertaining kills and low-quality charm.

As far as positive aspects in High Lane, I found myself chuckling at the subtitles a they can be entertaining. At one point in the film, the protagonist (our “final girl”) unsheathes a knife and the closed captioning reads: “Knife Pulled Sound,” which I think is like a shink noise but it’s funny to me that it is just kind of expected that the audience would know what “Knife Pulled Sound” means. I guess I can’t put that on the filmmakers, though, because their is a crew (or unpaid intern) for that sort of work. But I will blame them for the mediocre time I had watching this film.